Mountain Sour #5 Review

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Mountain Sour #5 is a standard-strength kettle-soured wheat ale refermented with 1.2 pounds per gallon of apricot purée.

Brewed on May 16, Mountain Sour #5 was soured to 3.5 pH using GoodBelly Probiotic Mango in a 113°F corny keg. After six days, I boiled the wort and fermented at 85°F using Imperial Yeast A43 – Loki (kveik) yeast. After reaching terminal gravity in just three days, I added Vintner’s Harvest Apricot Purée and allowed the fruit to referment to terminal gravity. Three weeks later, Mountain Sour #5 was carbonated, canned and consumed.

Appearance – The beer floods into my glass with an opaque orange juice hue, complemented with a frothy, sticky head that features coral highlights. For a kettle-sour, it has incredible head retention and lacing.

Smell – The pungent aromas of juicy apricot and candied peach rings completely overwhelm my nose. There is no mistaking the featured fruit in this beer!

Taste – Unfortunately, the flavor is quite less intense than the aroma. The GoodBelly lends hints of Lemonhead Candy and purple SweeTarts while the fruit itself tastes like a combination of apricot, peach and Granny Smith apple. Out of 10, I give the flavor intensity a lousy 6.

Mouthfeel – Mountain Sour #5 is spritzy and tart with a pleasant but underwhelming acidity. The touch of sweetness in the finish reinforces the peach candy component.

Overall – Like most of the kettle-sours I have brewed, Mountain Sour #5 is a bit one dimensional despite it’s refreshing and juicy elements. I am happy with this initial batch but look forward to see how the recipe evolves over time.

Changes For Next Time – As a close friend remarked – Mountain Sour #5 “needs something more.” Everything is a bit too modest for my liking! For my next iteration, I will aim for a final pH of 3.3 to lend a more acidic bite. I also plan to increase the fruit addition to at least 2.2 pounds per gallon so the fruit aroma and flavor are both unmistakable.

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